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Lincoln’s Rise to the Presidency By William C. Harris

Lincoln’s Rise to the Presidency

By William C. Harris

April 2007; 440 pages, 13 photographs, 1 map, 6-1⁄8 x 9-1⁄4; Cloth ISBN 978-0-7006-1520-9, $34.95 (t)

WINNER OF THE HENRY ADAMS PRIZE, SPONSORED BY THE SOCIETY FOR HISTORY IN THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

Lincoln’s Rise to the Presidency By William C. Harris
Lincoln’s Rise to the Presidency
By William C. Harris

Adopting a new approach to an American icon, an award-winning scholar reexamines the life of Abraham Lincoln to demonstrate how his remarkable political acumen and leadership skills evolved during the intense partisan conflict in pre-Civil War Illinois. By describing Lincoln’s rise from obscurity to the presidency, William Harris shows that Lincoln’s road to political success was far from easy—and that his reaction to events wasn’t always wise or his racial attitudes free of prejudice.

Although most scholars have labeled Lincoln a moderate, Harris reveals that he was by his own admission a conservative who revered the Founders and advocated “adherence to the old and tried.” By emphasizing the conservative bent that guided Lincoln’s political evolution—his background as a Henry Clay Whig, his rural ties, his cautious nature, and the racial and political realities of central Illinois—Harris provides fresh insight into Lincoln’s political ideas and activities and portrays him as morally opposed to slavery but fundamentally conservative in his political strategy against it.

Interweaving aspects of Lincoln’s life and character that were an integral part of his rise to prominence, Harris provides in-depth coverage of Lincoln’s controversial term in Congress, his re-emergence as the leader of the antislavery coalition in Illinois, and his Senate campaign against Stephen A. Douglas. He particularly describes how Lincoln organized the antislavery coalition into the Republican Party while retaining the support of its diverse elements, and sheds new light on Lincoln’s ongoing efforts to bring Know Nothing nativists into the coalition without alienating ethnic groups. He also provides new information and analysis regarding Lincoln’s nomination and election to the presidency, the selection of his cabinet, and his important role as president-elect during the secession crisis of 1860–1861.

Challenging prevailing views, Harris portrays Lincoln as increasingly driven not so much by his own ambitions as by his antislavery sentiments and his fear for the republic in the hands of Douglas Democrats, and he shows how the unique political skills Lincoln developed in Illinois shaped his wartime leadership abilities. By doing so, he opens a window on his political ideas and influences and offers a fresh understanding of this complex figure.

“Illuminates Lincoln’s remarkable rise from obscurity to the presidency and shows in fresh detail how he acquired, and exercised, the political skills and the wisdom that made him a great leader when he got there.”—William Lee Miller, author of Lincoln’s Virtues: An Ethical Biography

“An insightful account that convincingly portrays Lincoln as a tactically shrewd, strategically principled, and eloquently forceful leader and reconciler of the heterogeneous antislavery elements in both Illinois and the North at large. . . . A worthy companion to Harris’s prize-winning studies of Lincoln’s presidency.”—Michael Burlingame, author of The Inner World of Abraham Lincoln

“A fine, well-written study that provides sophisticated and balanced insights.”—Phillip Shaw Paludan, author of The Presidency of Abraham Lincoln

WILLIAM C. HARRIS professor emeritus of history at North Carolina State University and recipient of the Lincoln Diploma of Honor, is author of nine other books, including Day of the Carpetbagger: Republican Reconstruction in Mississippi, With Charity for All: Lincoln and the Restoration of the Union, and most recently Lincoln’s Last Months.

Kansas University Ordering Information: Our online ordering feature is currently under construction. You can order books from the University Press of Kansas by calling 785-864-4155. Orders can also be emailed to upkorders@ku.edu. Our shipping charges: $5.00 for first book, $1.00 for each additional book

 

Secret History of Confederate Diplomacy Abroad By Edwin De Leon

Secret History of Confederate Diplomacy Abroad

By Edwin De Leon

Edited by William C. Davis

November 2005; 240 pages, 1 photograph, 6 x 9; Cloth ISBN 978-0-7006-1411-0, $35.00

Secret History of Confederate Diplomacy Abroad By Edwin De Leon
Secret History of Confederate Diplomacy Abroad
By Edwin De Leon

One of the South’s most urgent priorities in the Civil War was obtaining the recognition of foreign governments. Edwin De Leon, a Confederate propagandist charged with wooing Britain and France, opens up this vital dimension of the war in the earliest known account by a Confederate foreign agent.

First published in the New York Citizen in 1867–68, De Leon’s memoir subsequently sank out of sight until its recent rediscovery by William C. Davis, one of the Civil War field’s true luminaries. Both reflective and engaging, it brims with insights and immediacy lacking in other works, covering everything from the diplomatic impact of the Battle of Bull Run to the candid opinions of Lord Palmerston to the progress of secret negotiations at Vichy.

De Leon discusses, among other things, the strong stand against slavery by the French and a frustrating policy of inaction by the British, as well as the troubling perceptions of some Europeans that the Confederacy was located in South America and that most Americans were a cross between Davy Crockett and Sam Slick. With France’s recognition a priority, De Leon published pamphlets and used French journals in a futile attempt to sway popular opinion and pressure the government of Napoleon III. His interpretation of the latter’s meeting with Confederate diplomat John Slidell and the eventual mediation proposal sheds new light on that signal event.

De Leon was a keen observer and a bit of a gossip, and his opinionated details and character portraits help shed light on the dark crevices of the South’s doomed diplomatic efforts and provide our only inside look at the workings of Napoleon’s court and Parliament regarding the Confederate cause. Davis adds an illuminating introduction that places De Leon’s career in historical context, reveals much about his propagandist strategies, and traces the history of the Secret History itself. Together they open up a provocative new window on the Civil War.

“Davis contributes a finely crafted and highly informative introduction to an insightful memoir by De Leon, whose rediscovered story provides a behind-the-scenes account of an overlooked ‘lost cause’—the South’s failure to secure foreign recognition as a nation—that might have changed the verdict of the war. . . . A valuable addition to the study of Civil War diplomacy.”—Howard Jones, author of Abraham Lincoln and a New Birth of Freedom: The Union and Slavery in the Diplomacy of the Civil War

“A rare first-hand account of Confederate diplomacy. Expertly introduced by Davis and filled with invaluable personal sketches and opinionated assessments of diplomatic questions, De Leon’s account adds important detail to our knowledge of the Civil War’s international dimensions.”—George C. Rable, author of The Confederate Republic: A Revolution against Politics

EDWIN De LEON (1818–1891) was the author of several travel books and novels and a two-volume memoir, Thirty Years of My Life on Three Continents. WILLIAM C. DAVIS is professor of history at Virginia Tech and a three-time winner of the Jefferson Davis Award for Confederate History. His other books include The Union That Shaped the Confederacy: Robert Toombs and Alexander H. Stephens, and, most recently, Look Away! A History of the Confederate States of America.

Kansas University Ordering Information: Our online ordering feature is currently under construction. You can order books from the University Press of Kansas by calling 785-864-4155. Orders can also be emailed to upkorders@ku.edu. Our shipping charges: $5.00 for first book, $1.00 for each additional book

 

The War within the Union High Command; Politics and Generalship during the Civil War By Thomas J. Goss

The War within the Union High Command; Politics and Generalship during the Civil War

By Thomas J. Goss

October 2003; 320 pages, 1 figure, 6 x 9
Modern War Studies; Cloth ISBN 978-0-7006-1263-5, $34.95

SELECTION OF THE HISTORY BOOK CLUB

SELECTION OF THE MILITARY BOOK CLUB

The War within the Union High Command; Politics and Generalship during the Civil War By Thomas J. Goss
The War within the Union High Command; Politics and Generalship during the Civil War
By Thomas J. Goss

With Union armies poised to launch the final campaigns against the Confederacy in 1864, three of its five commanders were “political generals”—appointed officers with little or no military training. Army chief of staff Henry Halleck thought such generals jeopardized the lives of men under their command and he and his peers held them in utter contempt. Historians have largely followed suit.

Thomas Goss, however, offers a new and more positive assessment of the leadership qualities of these Northern commanders. In the process, he cuts through the stereotypes of political generals as superfluous and largely inept tacticians, ambitious schemers, and military failures. Goss examines the reasons why the selection process yielded so many generals who lacked military backgrounds and explores the tense and often bitter relationships among political and professional officers to illuminate the dynamics of Union generalship during the war. As this book reveals, professional generals viewed the war as a military problem requiring battlefield solutions, while appointees (and President Lincoln) focused more emphatically on the broader political contours of the struggle. The resulting friction often eroded Northern morale and damaged the North’s war effort.

Goss challenges the traditional idea that success was measured only on the battlefield by demonstrating significant links between military success and the achievement of the Union’s political objectives. Examining commanders like Benjamin Butler, Nathaniel Banks, John McClernand, John Fremont, and Franz Sigel, Goss shows how many filled vital functions by raising troops, boosting homefront morale, securing national support for the war—and sometimes even achieving significant success on the battlefield. Comparing these generals with their professional counterparts reveals that all had vital roles to play in helping Lincoln prosecute the war and that West Pointers, despite their military training, were not necessarily better prepared for waging war.

Whether professional or appointed, Goss reminds us, all generals could be considered political inasmuch as war is a continuation of politics by other means. He shows us that far more was asked of Union commanders than to simply win battles and in so doing urges a new appreciation of those appointed leaders who were thrust into the maelstrom of the Civil War.

“Union ‘political generals’ were so inept, the story goes, that they should never have led armies. Not so, says Goss, whose argument is sure to create as much debate among modern readers as it did among wartime participants. . . . An important book.”–John F. Marszalek, author of Sherman: A Soldier’s Passion for Order

“A significant contribution that clarifies and sharpens our understanding of the strengths, weaknesses, and accomplishments of these generals, while at the same time providing a more complex vision of Union command overall.”–Herman Hattaway, author of Shades of Blue and Gray

“A must read for all serious students of the Civil War and the institutional development of the United States Army.”–Albert E. Castel, author of Decision in the West: The Atlanta Campaign of 1864

THOMAS J. GOSS, a major in the U.S. Army with a Ph.D. in history from Ohio State University, taught military history at West Point and is currently a strategic planner for Homeland Defense at U.S. Northern Command in Colorado Springs.

Kansas University Ordering Information: Our online ordering feature is currently under construction. You can order books from the University Press of Kansas by calling 785-864-4155. Orders can also be emailed to upkorders@ku.edu. Our shipping charges: $5.00 for first book, $1.00 for each additional book

 

Upton’s Regulars; The 121st New York Infantry in the Civil War By Salvatore G. Cilella Jr.

Upton’s Regulars; The 121st New York Infantry in the Civil War

By Salvatore G. Cilella Jr.

June 2009; 592 pages, 40 illustrations, 6-1⁄8 x 9-1⁄4
Modern War Studies; Cloth ISBN 978-0-7006-1645-9, $39.95

Upton’s Regulars; The 121st New York Infantry in the Civil War By Salvatore G. Cilella Jr.
Upton’s Regulars; The 121st New York Infantry in the Civil War
By Salvatore G. Cilella Jr.

From Cooperstown and its surrounding region, upstate New Yorkers responded to President Lincoln’s call to service by volunteering in droves to defend an imperiled Union. Drawn from the farms and towns of Otsego and Herkimer counties, the 121st New York State Volunteer Infantry Regiment served with the Sixth Corps in the Army of the Potomac throughout the Civil War. In the first comprehensive history of the regiment in nearly ninety years, Salvatore Cilella chronicles the epic story of this heroic “band of brothers.”

Led for much of the war by the legendary Emory Upton, the 121st deployed nearly 1,900 men into battle, from over 1,000 at call-up to the 330 who were finally mustered out of its war-depleted unit. Its soldiers participated in 25 major engagements, from Antietam to Sailor’s Creek, won six Medals of Honor, took several battle flags, led the charge at Spotsylvania, and captured Custis Lee at Sailor’s Creek. Cilella now tells their story, viewing the war through upstate New Yorkers’ eyes not only to depict three grueling years of fighting but also to reveal their distinctive attitudes regarding slavery, war goals, politics, and the families they left behind.

Cilella mines the letters, diaries, memoirs, and speeches of more than 120 soldiers and officers to weave a compelling narrative that traces the 121st from enlistment through the horrors of battle and back to civilian life. Their words vividly recount the experience of combat, but also rail against Washington bureaucrats and commanding generals. Many were upset with those who suggested that Emancipation was the war’s primary cause, declaring their fight to be for the Union rather than freed slaves, but they also scorned any Northerners who sympathized with the South.

Cilella also features compelling portraits of the regiment’s three commanders: original recruiter Richard Franchot; West Pointer Upton, by whose name the 121st came to be known; and Otsego County native Egbert Olcott. Readers will especially gain new insights into the charismatic Upton, who took command at the age of 23, was a fearless leader on the field of battle, and became one of the army’s most admired regimental leaders, clearly marking him out for future accomplishments.

As dire as the war became, especially in the summer of 1864, Upton’s Regulars repeatedly told their families they would do it all again and would sooner die in battle than shirk their responsibility to the Union. This regimental history stands as a testament to that dedication—and as an unvarnished look at the harsh realities of war.

“A rich portrait that deserves the attention of any serious student of the American Civil War.”—Journal of Military History

“This is an evocative, engaging, and often exciting portrait of a regiment that has been probed by historians before—but never with such a fine brew of deep scholarship and skillful writing, and never with such perception about not only military life, but also the political and social forces behind the lines. Salvatore Cilella has made a unique and highly readable contribution to Civil War literature.”—Harold Holzer, Co-chairman, U.S. Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission

“In a powerful and moving narrative, Cilella examines the men who served in the 121st New York infantry, from their rural backgrounds through vigorous warfare. This well documented study also explores how the survivors, only one-fourth of those who joined up, lived after the war. This book not only takes its place among the best of regimental histories, it serves as a model for the kinds of studies needed to understand the transformation of a war to preserve the union to one committed to a new birth of freedom.”—Orville Vernon Burton, author of The Age of Lincoln

“Cilella provides a remarkably full account of the 121st’s soldiers and their circumstances as they enlist, train, march off, and experience three years of the Civil War. His research on their experiences and attitudes is impressive, even amazing. Well written, informative, and analytical, it’s everything an excellent regimental history should be. I strongly recommend it.”—Steven Woodworth, author of Nothing But Victory: The Army of the Tennessee, 1861–1865

“Cilella wonderfully captures the experience of the common man in the Civil War as represented by those who were part of the campaigns of New York’s 121st Infantry.”—D. Stephen Elliott, President and CEO, New York State Historical Association and The Farmers’ Museum

SALVATORE G. CILELLA JR. is president and CEO of the Atlanta Historical Society.

Kansas University Ordering Information: Our online ordering feature is currently under construction. You can order books from the University Press of Kansas by calling 785-864-4155. Orders can also be emailed to upkorders@ku.edu. Our shipping charges: $5.00 for first book, $1.00 for each additional book

 

Women on the Civil War Battlefront By Richard H. Hall

Women on the Civil War Battlefront

By Richard H. Hall

May 2006 ; 384 pages, 23 illustrations, 6 x 9; Modern War Studies; Cloth ISBN 978-0-7006-1437-0, $34.95

Women on the Civil War Battlefront By Richard H. Hall
Women on the Civil War Battlefront
By Richard H. Hall

During the Civil War women did a lot more than keep the home fires burning. Expanding on his pioneering Patriots in Disguise, Richard Hall has now produced the most accurate and up-to-date survey available of women who were determined to serve their nation in that time of crisis.

Drawing on a wealth of regimental histories, newspaper archives, and a host of previously unreported accounts, Hall shows that women served in more capacities and in greater number—perhaps several thousand—than has previously been known. They served in the infantry, cavalry, and artillery and as spies, scouts, saboteurs, smugglers, and frontline nurses. From all walks of life, they followed husbands and lovers into battle, often in male disguise that remained undiscovered until they were wounded (or gave birth), and endured the same hardships and dangers as did their male counterparts.

Hall presents the most complete portrait yet available of these courageous women—including Sarah Bradbury, Lizzie Compton, Frances Hook, and Confederate spy Loreta Janeta Velazquez—many of whom earned the praise of the male soldiers they served with and rose through the ranks to become sergeants, even officers. Through his investigation of specific case histories, he has authenticated many previously undocumented reports while debunking myths and exposing previously published errors about the subject. The book also includes a biographical directory of nearly 400 women participants and dozens of Civil War documents attesting to women’s role in the war.

As a new synthesis and critical appraisal, Women on the Civil War Battlefront is a richly anecdotal work that unearths a hidden history and opens a new window on women’s lives in the nineteenth century. These women were determined to serve, and Hall’s research confirms that they did so in significant numbers—and with distinction.

“Hall’s main argument is that far more women were active in military affairs than previously thought, that women were in military places unknown to most historians of the war (such as prisoner-of-war camps), and that much of what we think we know about women’s activities is not necessarily accurate. . . . A substantial and significant contribution to the history of women during the Civil War.”–Janet L. Coryell, coeditor of Negotiating the Boundaries of Southern Womanhood

Civil War scholar RICHARD H. HALL is a free-lance writer and editor based in Brentwood, Maryland. He is the author of Patriots in Disguise: Women Warriors of the Civil War.

Kansas University Ordering Information: Our online ordering feature is currently under construction. You can order books from the University Press of Kansas by calling 785-864-4155. Orders can also be emailed to upkorders@ku.edu. Our shipping charges: $5.00 for first book, $1.00 for each additional book

 

The Cause Lost; Myths and Realities of the Confederacy By William C. Davis

The Cause Lost; Myths and Realities of the Confederacy

By William C. Davis

New in paperback: March 2003; xii, 224 pages, 23 photographs, 6 x 9; Modern War Studies; Paper ISBN 978-0-7006-1254-3, $15.95 (t)

WINNER OF THE LANEY PRIZE, SPONSORED BY THE AUSTIN CIVIL WAR ROUND TABLE

MAIN SELECTION OF THE HISTORY BOOK CLUB

The Cause Lost; Myths and Realities of the Confederacy By William C. Davis
The Cause Lost; Myths and Realities of the Confederacy
By William C. Davis

For nearly a quarter of a century, Pulitzer Prize nominee William C. Davis has been one of our best writers on the Civil War. His books–including Breckinridge: Statesman, Soldier, Symbol; Jefferson Davis: The Man and His Hour; and “A Government of Our Own”: The Making of the Confederacy–have garnered numerous awards and enlightened and entertained an avid readership. The Cause Lost extends that tradition of excellence with provocative new insights into the myths and realities of an endlessly fascinating subject.

In these pages, Davis brings into sharp focus the facts and fictions of the South’s victories and defeats, its tenacious struggle to legitimize its cause and defeat an overpowering enemy, and its ultimate loss of will. He debunks long-standing legends, offers irrefutable evidence explaining Confederate actions, and contemplates the idealism, naivete, folly, and courage of the military leadership and would-be founding fathers.

Among the most misunderstood, Davis contends, was Jefferson Davis. Often branded as enigmatic and incompetent, the Confederate president was simply a decent and committed leader whose mistakes were magnified by the war’s extraordinary demands. Davis scrutinizes Jefferson Davis’ relationship with his generals–most of whom were unproved talents or cronies with proven deficiencies–and reveals why only Robert E. Lee succeeded in winning Davis’ confidence through flattery, persuasion, and a sense of responsibility. He also examines the myths and memories of the nearly deified Stonewall Jackson and of John C. Breckinridge, the only effective Confederate secretary of war.

Davis also illustrates why the cause of the war–a subject of long-standing controversy–boils down to the single issue of slavery; why Southerners, 90 percent of whom didn’t own slaves, were willing to join in the battle to defend their homeland; how the personalities, tactics, and styles of the armies in the turbulent West differed greatly from those in the East; what real or perceived turning points influenced Southern decision making; and how mythology and misinterpretations have been perpetuated through biography, history, literature, and film.

Revealing the Confederacy’s myths for what they really are, Davis nevertheless illustrates how much those myths inform our understanding of the Civil War and its place in Southern and American culture.

“Celebrated author William C. Davis here offers us stimulating essays full of provocative opinions. Will provoke plenty of healthy debate.”–Blue & Gray Magazine

“A wonderful book, written by a man with full command of, and great love for, his subject. Davis grasps the war in its totality, decently and respectfully. He does not so much demolish myths as clarify and nuance them.”–Washington Times

“This splendid collection, characterized by the same insight, humor, and delightful irreverence found in all Davis’s writing, has something for everyone.”–Journal of Southern History

“Davis advances strong opinions without qualification and often in a bold, memorable way.”–Georgia Historical Quarterly

“This provocative book challenges readers to look at old questions in new ways. It ‘s a splendid read, entertaining and enlightening in equal measure and leavened with more than a dash of humor.”–Gary W. Gallagher, editor of The Third Day at Gettysburg and Beyond

“The Cause Lost provides interesting and informative reading, in the process presenting some new ideas and fresh facts while exposing some old fallacies.”–Albert Castel, author of Decision in the West: The Atlanta Campaign of 1864

“William C. Davis is one of the best and most prolific historians of the American Civil War. His many books on battles, commanders, and Civil War photography have added immeasurably to our knowledge and understanding.”–James M. McPherson, author of Battle Cry of Freedom

WILLIAM C. DAVIS is the recipient of three Jefferson Davis Awards as well as the T. Harry Williams Memorial Award, Bell I. Wiley Prize, Fletcher Pratt Award, Phi Alpha Theta Award, and Harry S. Truman Award. He lives in Pennsylvania, barely fifty miles from the battlefields of Gettysburg.

Kansas University Ordering Information: Our online ordering feature is currently under construction. You can order books from the University Press of Kansas by calling 785-864-4155. Orders can also be emailed to upkorders@ku.edu. Our shipping charges: $5.00 for first book, $1.00 for each additional book

 

Punitive War; Confederate Guerrillas and Union Reprisals By Clay Mountcastle

Punitive War; Confederate Guerrillas and Union Reprisals

By Clay Mountcastle

September 2009 ; 212 pages, 20 photographs, 5 maps, 6 x 9
Modern War Studies; Cloth ISBN 978-0-7006-1668-8, $29.95 (t)

Punitive War; Confederate Guerrillas and Union Reprisals By Clay Mountcastle
Punitive War; Confederate Guerrillas and Union Reprisals
By Clay Mountcastle

Through widespread and relentless surprise attacks and ambushes, Confederate guerrillas drove Union soldiers and their leaders to desperation. Confederate cavalrymen engaged in hit-and-run tactics; autonomous partisan rangers preyed on Federal railroads, telegraph lines, and supply wagons; and civilian bushwhackers waylaid Union pickets. Together, all of these actions persuaded the Union to wage an increasingly punitive war.

Clay Mountcastle presents a new look at the complex nature of guerrilla warfare in the Civil War and the Union Army’s calculated response to it. He examines guerrilla attacks and Federal responses in a number of operational theaters to show how the problem grew throughout the South and ultimately convinced the Union to adopt retaliatory measures that challenged the sensibilities of even the most hardened soldiers.

In revealing the impact that Confederate guerrilla activity had on the Union’s prosecution of the war, Mountcastle reveals how the character of the war was shaped every bit as much by the troops on the ground as by their Union leaders. He draws on primary sources that vividly convey their reaction to the guerrilla problem and their justification for punitive action—with guerrillas described by one angry soldier as “thieves and murderers by occupation, rebels by pretense, soldiers only in name, and cowards by nature.” Showing how much of the impetus for retaliation originated from the bottom up, starting in the western theater in 1861, he describes how it became the most influential factor in convincing Union generals, especially Grant and Sherman, that the war needed to be extended to include civilians and their property. The result was a level of destructiveness that has been downplayed by other scholars—despite the evidence of executions and incidents of entire towns being burned to the ground.

By 1864, punitive action had evolved into such a powerful and decisive force that it produced what has been called “a warfare of frightfulness.” And although guerrilla activity deviled the Union until the end, the Union’s response ultimately proved a significant factor in persuading leaders like General Lee to call a halt to such actions and, ultimately, to surrender. Mountcastle’s book offers the most revealing look yet at this incompletely understood dimension of the Civil War and also raises provocative questions about the relationship between guerrilla and conventional warfare in any conflict.

“A scrupulously researched, deftly organized, and compellingly written history of Rebel guerrilla warfare and the Union’s escalating tactics of ever-harsher punitive reprisals.”—Washington Times

“Mountcastle demonstrates, with powerful insight, deep archival research, and crisp writing, the central role of guerilla warfare during the Civil War. . . . This is a close-up view of the real Civil War, unrelentingly savage and utterly inhumane.”—Michael Fellman, author of In the Name of God: Reconsidering Terrorism in American History

“This excellent combination of storytelling and analysis explains better than any previous work how the Confederacy’s guerrilla war influenced Union military policy.”—Daniel E. Sutherland, author of Seasons of War: The Ordeal of
a Confederate Community, 1861–1865

“Packs as much punch as the Union’s punitive war itself.”—Brian S. Wills, author of The War Hits Home

“Most historians merely lay out facts in chronological order, relying on good research. Clay Mountcastle goes several steps further. He repeatedly states his central premise—that Confederate guerrilla activity was the proximate cause of the development of Union ‘hard war’ policy. He supports that premise with solid archival research and then adds great historiographical research to point out that previous historians have not taken their analysis far enough to connect the two dots. This book is military analysis at its best.”—S. Waite Rawls III, President and CEO, Museum of the Confederacy

CLAY MOUNTCASTLE, a major in the U.S. Army, has taught military history at West Point and is currently Battalion Executive Officer with Air Defense Artillery, stationed in Korea.

Kansas University Ordering Information: Our online ordering feature is currently under construction. You can order books from the University Press of Kansas by calling 785-864-4155. Orders can also be emailed to upkorders@ku.edu. Our shipping charges: $5.00 for first book, $1.00 for each additional book

 

The Union That Shaped the Confederacy By Robert Toombs and Alexander H. Stephens; William C. Davis

The Union That Shaped the Confederacy

By Robert Toombs and Alexander H. Stephens; William C. Davis

April 2001; 304 pages, 2 photographs, 6 x 9
Cloth ISBN 978-0-7006-1088-4, $29.95 (t)

SELECTION OF THE HISTORY BOOK CLUB

The Union That Shaped the Confederacy By Robert Toombs and Alexander H. Stephens; William C. Davis
The Union That Shaped the Confederacy
By Robert Toombs and Alexander H. Stephens; William C. Davis

One was a robust charmer given to fits of passion, whose physical appeal could captivate women as easily as cajole colleagues. The other was a frail, melancholy man of quiet intellect, whose ailments drove him eventually to alcohol and drug addiction. Born into different social classes, they were as opposite as men could be. Yet these sons of Georgia, Robert Toombs and Alexander H. Stephens, became fast friends and together changed the course of the South.

Writing with the style and authority that has made him one of our most popular historians of the Civil War, William C. Davis has written a biography of a friendship that captures the Confederacy in microcosm. He tells how Toombs and Stephens dominated the formation of the new nation and served as its vice president and secretary of state. After years of disillusionment, each abandoned participation in the government and left to its own fate a Confederacy that would not dance to their tune.

Davis traces this unlikely relationship from its early days in the Georgia legislature through the trials of secession and war, revealing how both men persevered during the war and developed a deep animosity for Jefferson Davis. He then chronicles their postwar lives up to the emotional moment when Toombs stood eulogizing his long-time friend at his funeral, just four months after Stephens was elected governor of the Georgia they had loved as much as one another.

Drawing extensively on primary sources, including Stephens’s voluminous letters and Toombs’s widely scattered papers, Davis tells how two men of different temperaments remained friends, out of step with all but a few and occasionally even with each other. He concentrates on their Confederate years, when the fraternity they shared had its greatest impact, to show how they embodied both the strengths and the weaknesses of the Confederacy.

While there are biographies of each man, none convey the significance–or the depth–of their friendship. Davis shows us how they loved the South as it once was, the Union as they thought it ought to have been, and the Confederacy of their dreams that never came to be. They lost all three, but through five decades of crisis, they never failed each other.

“A sympathetic but also sharply critical treatment of how two deeply flawed southern politicians both helped create and destroy the Confederacy. . . . Brings back excitement to the political history of the Civil War.”–George Rable, author of The Confederate Republic

“In this engaging narrative, Davis offers compelling portraits of the two men, describes their critical roles in Confederate history, and illuminates the process by which their friendship thrived amid increasingly difficult political circumstances.”–Gary W. Gallagher, author of The Confederate War

“A marvelous book that reads like a novel.”–Emory M. Thomas, author of Robert E. Lee: A Biography

WILLIAM C. DAVIS is the author of more than forty books about the Civil War, including The Cause Lost: Myths and Realities of the Confederacy, also published by Kansas and Jefferson Davis, The Man and His Hour. Recipient of three Jefferson Davis Awards and numerous other prizes, he is presently professor of history and director of programs at the Virginia Center for Civil War Studies at Virginia Tech.

Kansas University Ordering Information: Our online ordering feature is currently under construction. You can order books from the University Press of Kansas by calling 785-864-4155. Orders can also be emailed to upkorders@ku.edu. Our shipping charges: $5.00 for first book, $1.00 for each additional book

 

While God Is Marching On; The Religious World of Civil War Soldiers By Steven E. Woodworth

While God Is Marching On; The Religious World of Civil War Soldiers

By Steven E. Woodworth

New in paperback: October 2003; xii, 394 pages, 6 x 9
Modern War Studies; Paper ISBN 978-0-7006-1297-0, $19.95 (t)

While God Is Marching On; The Religious World of Civil War Soldiers By Steven E. Woodworth
While God Is Marching On; The Religious World of Civil War Soldiers
By Steven E. Woodworth

They read the same Bible and prayed to the same God, but they faced each other in battle with rage in their hearts. The Civil War not only pitted brother against brother but also Christian against Christian, with soldiers from North and South alike devoutly believing that God was on their side.

Steven Woodworth, one of our most prominent and provocative Civil War historians, presents the first detailed study of soldiers’ religious beliefs and how they influenced the course of that tragic conflict. He shows how Christian teaching and practice shaped the worldview of soldiers on both sides: how it motivated them for the struggle, how it influenced the way they fought, and how it shaped national life after the war ended.

Through the diaries, letters, and reminiscences of common soldiers, Woodworth illuminates religious belief from the home front to the battlefield, where thoughts of death and the afterlife were always close at hand. Woodworth reveals what these men thought about God and what they believed God thought about the war.

Wrote one Unionist, “I believe our cause to be the cause of liberty and light . . . the cause of God, and holy and justifiable in His sight, and for this reason, I fear not to die in it if need be.” With a familiar echo, his Confederate counterpart declared that “our Cause is Just and God is Just and we shall finally be successful whether I live to see the time or not.”

Woodworth focuses on mainstream Protestant beliefs and practices shared by the majority of combatants in order to help us better understand soldiers’ motivations and to realize what a strong role religion played in American life throughout the conflict. In addition, he provides sharp insights into the relationship between Christianity and both the abolition movement in the North and the institution of slavery in the South.

Ultimately, Woodworth shows us how opposing armies could put their trust in the same God while engaging in four years of organized slaughter and destruction. His compelling work provides a rich new perspective on religion in American life and will forever change the way we look at the Civil War.

“It is exemplary in many ways—not least in its utterly respectful attitude toward popular religion.”–Journal of American History

“A pioneering and often insightful work on an important subject.”–Journal of Military History

“Entertaining and informative.”–Civil War Book Review

“A genuine contribution to the literature on the world of Civil War soldiers.”–James M. McPherson, author of Battle Cry of Freedom

“Fills a longstanding gap in our understanding of the Civil War. Tough-minded exposition, veins of wit, and arresting insights make this highly accessible, dazzling work a delight and inspiration to read.”–Bertram Wyatt-Brown, author of The Shaping of Southern Culture: Honor, Grace, and War

“A sweeping study that moves to the forefront of all books treating faith among Johnny Rebs and Billy Yanks.”–James I. Robertson, Jr., author of Stonewall Jackson: The Man, The Soldier, The Legend

“One of those rare works that displays impressive scholarship but grips the emotions as well.”–Marvin Olasky, editor of World Magazine

STEVEN E. WOODWORTH is associate professor of history at Texas Christian University. He is the author of Grant’s Lieutenants: From Cairo to Vicksburg, Civil War Generals in Defeat, and a two-time winner of the prestigious Fletcher Pratt Award, for his books Davis and Lee at War and Jefferson Davis and His Generals.

Kansas University Ordering Information: Our online ordering feature is currently under construction. You can order books from the University Press of Kansas by calling 785-864-4155. Orders can also be emailed to upkorders@ku.edu. Our shipping charges: $5.00 for first book, $1.00 for each additional book

 

War’s Desolating Scourge; The Union’s Occupation of North Alabama By Joseph W. Danielson

War’s Desolating Scourge; The Union’s Occupation of North Alabama

By Joseph W. Danielson

May 2012; 248 pages, 16 photographs, 4 maps, 6 x 9;
Modern War Studies; Cloth ISBN 978-0-7006-1844-6, $34.95

War’s Desolating Scourge; The Union’s Occupation of North Alabama By Joseph W. Danielson
War’s Desolating Scourge; The Union’s Occupation of North Alabama
By Joseph W. Danielson

When General Ormsby Mitchel and his Third Division, Army of the Ohio, marched into North Alabama in April 1862, they initiated the first occupation of an inland region in the Deep South during the Civil War. As an occupying force, soldiers were expected to adhere to President Lincoln’s policy of conciliation, a conservative strategy based on the belief that most southerners were loyal to the Union. Confederate civilians in North Alabama not only rejected their occupiers’ conciliatory overtures, but they began sabotaging Union telegraph lines and trains, conducting guerrilla operations, and even verbally abusing troops. Confederates’ dogged resistance compelled Mitchel and his men to jettison conciliation in favor of a “hard war” approach to restoring Federal authority in the region. This occupation turned out to be the first of a handful of instances where Union soldiers occupied North Alabama.

In this first book-length account of the occupations of North Alabama, Joseph Danielson opens a new window on the strength of Confederate nationalism in the region, the Union’s evolving policies toward defiant civilians, and African Americans’ efforts to achieve lasting freedom. His study reveals that Federal troops’ creation of punitive civil-military policies—arrests, compulsory loyalty oaths, censorship, confiscation of provisions, and the destruction of civilian property—started much earlier than previous accounts have suggested.

Over the course of the various occupations, Danielson shows Union soldiers becoming increasingly hardened in their interactions with Confederates, even to the point of targeting Rebel women. During General William T. Sherman’s time in North Alabama, he implemented his destructive policies on local Confederates a few months before beginning his “March to the Sea.” As Union soldiers sought to pacify rebellious civilians, African Americans engaged in a host of actions to undermine the institution of slavery and the Confederacy.

While Confederate civilians did their best to remain committed to the cause, Danielson argues that battlefield losses and seemingly unending punitive policies by their occupiers led to the collapse of the Confederate home front in North Alabama. In the immediate post-war period, however, ex-Confederates were largely able to define the limits of Reconstruction and restore the South’s caste system. War’s Desolating Scourge is the definitive account of this stressful chapter of the war and of the determination of Confederate civilians to remain ideologically committed to independence—a determination that reverberates to this day.

“Danielson’s thought-provoking study shows this supposedly unionist region of the Deep South to have been sharply divided, and to have boasted a Confederate population that persevered far longer than might be expected against the ‘punitive’ and ‘hard war’ policies of Union occupation.”—Daniel E. Sutherland, author of A Savage Conflict: The Decisive Role of Guerrillas in the American Civil War

“Essential reading for anyone interested in the experience of the Southern people under Union military occupation.”—Stephen V. Ash, author of When the Yankees Came: Conflict and Chaos in the Occupied South, 1861–1865

“Eminently readable and wonderfully researched.”—Stephen D. Engle, author of Struggle for the Heartland: The Campaigns from Fort Henry to Corinth

JOSEPH W. DANIELSON teaches history at Des Moines Area Community College.

Kansas University Ordering Information: Our online ordering feature is currently under construction. You can order books from the University Press of Kansas by calling 785-864-4155. Orders can also be emailed to upkorders@ku.edu. Our shipping charges: $5.00 for first book, $1.00 for each additional book

 

Victors in Blue; How Union Generals Fought the Confederates, Battled Each Other, and Won the Civil War By Albert Castel with Brooks D. Simpson

Victors in Blue; How Union Generals Fought the Confederates, Battled Each Other, and Won the Civil War

 By Albert Castel with Brooks D. Simpson

November 2011; 392 pages, 10 photographs, 10 maps, 6-1⁄8 x 9-1⁄4; Modern War Studies; Cloth ISBN 978-0-7006-1793-7, $34.95 (t)

Victors in Blue; How Union Generals Fought the Confederates, Battled Each Other, and Won the Civil War  By Albert Castel with Brooks D. Simpson
Victors in Blue; How Union Generals Fought the Confederates, Battled Each Other, and Won the Civil War
By Albert Castel with Brooks D. Simpson

Make no mistake, the Confederacy had the will and valor to fight. But the Union had the manpower, the money, the matériel, and, most important, the generals. Although the South had arguably the best commander in the Civil War in Robert E. Lee, the North’s full house beat their one-of-a-kind. Flawed individually, the Union’s top officers nevertheless proved collectively superior across a diverse array of battlefields and ultimately produced a victory for the Union.

Now acclaimed author Albert Castel brings his inimitable style, insight, and wit to a new reconsideration of these generals. With the assistance of Brooks Simpson, another leading light in this field, Castel has produced a remarkable capstone volume to a distinguished career. In it, he reassesses how battles and campaigns forged a decisive Northern victory, reevaluates the generalship of the victors, and lays bare the sometimes vicious rivalries among the Union generals and their effect on the war.

From Shiloh to the Shenandoah, Chickamauga to Chattanooga, Castel provides fresh accounts of how the Union commanders—especially Grant, Sherman, Sheridan, Thomas, and Meade but also Halleck, Schofield, and Rosecrans—outmaneuvered and outfought their Confederate opponents. He asks of each why he won: Was it through superior skill, strength of arms, enemy blunders, or sheer chance? What were his objectives and how did he realize them? Did he accomplish more or less than could be expected under the circumstances? And if less, what could he have done to achieve more—and why did he not do it? Castel also sheds new light on the war within the war: the intense rivalries in the upper ranks, complicated by the presence in the army of high-ranking non–West Pointers with political wagons attached to the stars on their shoulders.

A decade in the writing, Victors in Blue brims with novel, even outrageous interpretations that are sure to stir debate. As certain as the Union achieved victory, it will inform, provoke, and enliven sesquicentennial discussions of the Civil War.

“Stimulating and controversial, Victors in Blue provides a pleasing narrative that is at once a clear overview of the war’s military operations and a fascinating examination of its great commanders.”–Steven E. Woodworth, author of This Great Struggle: America’s Civil War

“A succinct account, by an accomplished historian known for his common sense and perceptive insight, that provides an outstanding view of the leading Union generals amid the high drama of our Civil War.”–Wiley Sword, author of Confederacy’s Last Hurrah: Spring Hill, Franklin, and Nashville

“Insightfully written with eloquence and wit, Victors in Blue is a pleasure to read.”–William C. Davis, author of Lincoln’s Men and Jefferson Davis

ALBERT CASTEL is the author of numerous books, including the Lincoln Prize–winning Decision in the West: The Atlanta Campaign of 1864; Tom Taylor’s Civil War; and Civil War Kansas: Reaping the Whirlwind. BROOKS D. SIMPSON is professor of history at Arizona State University and the author of Ulysses S. Grant: Triumph over Adversity, 1822–1865; Let Us Have Peace: Ulysses S. Grant and the Politics of War and Reconstruction, 1861–1868; and The Reconstruction Presidents

Kansas University Ordering Information: Our online ordering feature is currently under construction. You can order books from the University Press of Kansas by calling 785-864-4155. Orders can also be emailed to upkorders@ku.edu. Our shipping charges: $5.00 for first book, $1.00 for each additional book

 

Corinth 1862; Siege, Battle, Occupation By Timothy B. Smith

Corinth 1862; Siege, Battle, Occupation

 By Timothy B. Smith

May 2012; 472 pages, 22 photographs, 8 maps, 6 x 9; Modern War Studies; Cloth ISBN 978-0-7006-1852-1, $39.95

Winner Of The Fletcher Pratt Award

WINNER OF THE Mclemore PRIZE

Corinth, 1862 Siege, Battle, Occupation (Timothy B. Smith, author)
Corinth, 1862 Siege, Battle, Occupation (Timothy B. Smith, author)

In the spring of 1862, there was no
more important place in the western Confederacy—perhaps in all the South—than the tiny town of Corinth, Mississippi.

Major General Henry W. Halleck, commander of Union forces in the Western Theater, reported to Washington that “Richmond and Corinth are now the great strategical points of war, and our success at these points should be insured at all hazards.” In the same vein, Confederate General
P. G. T. Beauregard declared to Richmond that “If defeated at Corinth, we lose the Mississippi Valley and probably our cause.” Those were odd sentiments concerning a town scarcely a decade old. By this time, however, it sat at the junction of the South’s two most important rail lines and had become a major strategic locale.

Despite its significance, Corinth has received comparatively little attention from Civil War historians and has been largely overshadowed by events at Shiloh, Antietam, and Perryville. Timothy Smith’s panoramic and vividly detailed new look at Corinth corrects that neglect, focusing on the nearly year-long campaign that opened the way to Vicksburg and presaged the Confederacy’s defeat in the West.

Combining big-picture strategic and operational analysis with ground-level views, Smith covers the spring siege, the vicious attacks and counterattacks of the October battle, and the subsequent occupation. He has drawn extensively on hundreds of eyewitness accounts to capture the sights, sounds, and smells of battle and highlight the command decisions of Halleck, Beauregard, Ulysses S. Grant, Sterling Price, William S. Rosecrans, and Earl Van Dorn.

This is also the first in-depth examination of Corinth following the creation of a new National Park Service center located at the site. Weaving together an immensely compelling tale that places the reader in the midst of war’s maelstrom, it substantially revises and enlarges our understanding of Corinth and its crucial importance in the Civil War.

“This is Civil War military history at its finest.”—William C. Davis, author of Lincoln’s Men and Jefferson Davis

“A splendid blending of military and social history that brings to life the tragedies and humanity of a war-torn town.”—Michael B. Ballard, author of Vicksburg: The Campaign that Opened the Mississippi

“Deftly fills in the crucial gap between Shiloh and Vicksburg and does it in grand style.”—William L. Shea, author of Fields of Blood: The Prairie Grove Campaign

“Should become the book on Corinth in the Civil War.”—John Marszalek, author of Commander of All Lincoln’s Armies: A Life of Henry W. Halleck

TIMOTHY B. SMITH is author of a half dozen books, including Mississippi in the Civil War: The Homefront; Champion Hill: Decisive Battle for Vicksburg; and The Untold Story of Shiloh: The Battle and the Battlefield. He currently teaches at the University of Tennessee at Martin.

Kansas University Ordering Information: Our online ordering feature is currently under construction. You can order books from the University Press of Kansas by calling 785-864-4155. Orders can also be emailed to upkorders@ku.edu. Our shipping charges: $5.00 for first book, $1.00 for each additional book

 

Civil War Generals in Defeat Edited by Steven E. Woodworth

Civil War Generals in Defeat

 Edited by Steven E. Woodworth

248 pages, 7 illustrations, 6 x 9; Modern War Studies; Cloth ISBN 978-0-7006-0943-7, $29.95 (t)

Civil War Generals in Defeat  Edited by Steven E. Woodworth
Civil War Generals in Defeat
Edited by Steven E. Woodworth

Commanders who serve on the losing side of a battle, campaign, or war are often harshly viewed by posterity. Labeled as mere “losers,” they go unrecognized for their very real abilities and achievements in other engagements. The writers in this volume challenge such simplistic notions.

By looking more closely at Civil War generals who have borne the stigma of failure, these authors reject the reductionist view that significant defeats were due simply to poor generalship. Analyzing men who might be considered “capable failures”–officers of high prewar reputation, some with distinguished records in the Civil War–they examine the various reasons these men suffered defeat, whether flaws of character, errors of judgment, lack of preparation, or circumstances beyond their control.

These seven case studies consider Confederate and Union generals evenhandedly. They show how Albert Sidney Johnston failed in the face of extreme conditions and inadequate support, how Joe Hooker and John C. Pemberton were outmatched in confrontations with Lee and Grant, how George B. McClellan in the Peninsula Campaign and Don Carlos Buell at Chattanooga faced political as well as military complications, and how Joseph E. Johnston failed to adapt to challenges in Virginia. An additional chapter looks at generals from both sides at the Battle of Gettysburg, showing how failure to adjust to circumstances can thwart even the most seasoned leader’s expectations.

“This book about Civil War generals that historians have called losers is clearly a winner. The authors persuasively argue that winning or losing a battle should not simplistically be attributed solely to a general’s talents or weaknesses. Will stimulate spirited discussion among professional historians and amateurs alike-as only good history can.”–John F. Marszalek, author of Sherman: A Soldier’s Passion for Order

“A needed corrective to the facile ‘what fools they were’ school of military history, this book examines why some of the most capable commanders of the war failed the ‘test of merit’-battlefield success. Sometimes controversial but unfailingly interesting.”–Mark Grimsley, author of The Hard Hand of War: Union Military Policy Toward Southern Civilians, 1861–1865

STEVEN E. WOODWORTH is an assistant professor of history at Texas Christian University. He is the author of While God Is Marching On: The Religious World of Civil War Soldiers, Grant’s Lieutenants: From Cairo to Vicksburg, and a two-time winner of the prestigious Fletcher Pratt Award, for his books Davis and Lee at War and Jefferson Davis and His Generals.

CONTRIBUTORS AND SUBJECTS
Steven E. Woodworth on Albert Sidney Johnston
Alan Downs on Joseph E. Johnston
Ethan S. Rafuse on George B. McClellan
Stephen D. Engle on Don Carlos Buell
Stephen W. Sears on Fighting Joe Hooker
Michael B. Ballard on John C. Pemberton
Brooks D. Simpson on the Gettysburg generals

Kansas University Ordering Information: Our online ordering feature is currently under construction. You can order books from the University Press of Kansas by calling 785-864-4155. Orders can also be emailed to upkorders@ku.edu. Our shipping charges: $5.00 for first book, $1.00 for each additional book

 

Lincoln Seen and Heard By Harold Holzer

Lincoln Seen and Heard

By Harold Holzer

February 2000; 240 pages, 55 illustrations, 6 x 9; Cloth ISBN 978-0-7006-1001-3, $29.95 (t)

Lincoln Seen and Heard By Harold Holzer
Lincoln Seen and Heard By Harold Holzer

His image today is part of America, from the penny to Mount Rushmore, but in his own day Abraham Lincoln was as much reviled as he was revered, and he remained a controversial figure up to the time of his assassination. Now one of our preeminent authorities on Lincoln charts his rocky road from obscure western politician to national icon.

In Lincoln Seen and Heard, Harold Holzer probes the development of Lincoln’s image and reputation in his own time. He examines a vast array of visual and documentary sources to demonstrate the president’s impact both on the public and on the historical imagination, enabling us to see the man from Illinois as his contemporaries saw him.

Holzer considers a wide range of images–prints, portraits, political cartoons-to reveal what they say about Lincoln. He shows the ways in which Lincoln was depicted as Great Emancipator and as commander-in-chief, how he was assailed in cartoons from both sides of the Mason-Dixon line, and how printmakers both memorialized and capitalized on his assassination. Sharing dozens of historic reproductions, Holzer writes with unabashed enthusiasm as he unravels the symbolic meaning and the message of these images and explains their relation to political and military events of the time.

Holzer also takes a closer look at Lincoln’s oratory, the words of a man often ridiculed for his manner of speaking and homespun image. He shows how Lincoln’s choice of words in the Emancipation Proclamation was actually designed to minimize its humanitarianism and argues that the myth of his failure at Gettysburg has been unfairly exaggerated. Through this provocative collection, Lincoln emerges not only as a leader dependent upon his public image but also as an active participant in its development. Lincoln Seen and Heard helps us distinguish man from myth, while offering a superb introduction to the work of one of our most provocative Lincoln scholars.

“Today Abraham Lincoln has iconic status. But how was he perceived in his own day? Printmakers vacillated between presenting him as the quintessential civilian and as the god of war. The Gettysburg Address received raves in Republican papers, but it was panned by Democratic publications. In this book Holzer offers illuminating readings of such verbal and visual images of Lincoln from his own era.”–Publishers Weekly

“Holzer is one of the most respected writers in the field of Lincoln studies and an unexcelled authority on the iconography of the Civil War. Written with clarity, verve, and wit, this book adds a valuable new dimension to our understanding of Lincoln and his times.”–Richard N. Current, author of The Lincoln Nobody Knows

“Harold Holzer has grabbed the brass ring again. With wit and fresh insights into Lincoln iconography and caricature, he adds immeasurably to our understanding-and enjoyment-of the political climate of the Civil War.”–William Hanchett, author of Out of the Wilderness: The Life of Abraham Lincoln

“Holzer’s work continues to expand and enrich the Lincoln field.”–Mark E. Neely, Jr., author of The Last Best Hope of Earth: Abraham Lincoln and the Promise of America

HAROLD HOLZER is Senior Vice President for External Affairs at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art. One of the country’s leading authorities on the iconography and political culture of the Civil War, he has been a consultant to numerous television productions on that conflict. Among his many books are The Lincoln Image and The Lincoln Mailbag: America Writes to the President, 1860–1865.

Kansas University Ordering Information: Our online ordering feature is currently under construction. You can order books from the University Press of Kansas by calling 785-864-4155. Orders can also be emailed to upkorders@ku.edu. Our shipping charges: $5.00 for first book, $1.00 for each additional book

 

Civil War Kansas; Reaping the Whirlwind by Albert Castel

Civil War Kansas; Reaping the Whirlwind

 The Authorized Edition with a New Preface

By Albert Castel

xvi, 252 pages, 18 photographs, 5 maps, 5-1/2 x 8-1/2
Modern War Studies; Paper ISBN 978-0-7006-0872-0, $15.95

Civil War Kansas; Reaping the Whirlwind by Albert Castel
Civil War Kansas; Reaping the Whirlwind by Albert Castel

“The long agony” was over: Kansas, as of January 29, 1861, was a state–it had “moved to America.” In Leavenworth, Lawrence, Topeka, and other towns Kansans celebrated the “glorious news” of the coming of statehood in a “fury of excitement.” Cannons boomed, cheering crowds gathered on the street corners, a judge and a militia general stood on their heads, and the saloons were scenes of inebriated revelry.

So begins Albert Castel’s classic history of Kansas during the Civil War. Long recognized as a key study on the war in the trans-Mississippi West, Civil War Kansas describes the political, military, social, and economic events of the state’s first four years. Castel contributes to a better understanding of the Civil War in this region through a realistic presentation and analysis of the Kansas-Missouri border conflict, the operations of the Missouri guerrillas under Quantrill, and the Union and Confederate military campaigns in Missouri, Arkansas, the Indian Territory, and Kansas itself.

“This book has achieved the status of a classic in the genre.”–James M. McPherson, author of Battle Cry of Freedom

“This superb history of Kansas during the Civil War era remains a model study that casts great light on the troubled history of the Western border.”–David Herbert Donald, author of Lincoln

“The best book we have on the Civil War in Kansas.”–Allan Nevins, author of The War for the Union

“An eminently readable book, reflecting understanding of issues and leaders in a state which entered the Union just as the ‘erring sisters’ were attempting to depart.”–Dudley Taylor Cornish, author of The Sable Arm: Black Troops in the Union Army

“In this spirited history, Castel, a Wichita native, uncovers villains by the dozen but nary a hero.”–Wichita Eagle

ALBERT CASTEL is widely recognized as one of our most respected historians of the Civil War. His Decision in the West: The Atlanta Campaign of 1864 won the prestigious Lincoln Prize and was named one of the 400 Most Notable Books of the Year by the New York Times Book Review and one of the 100 Best Books on the Civil War by Civil War Magazine. He is also the author of General Sterling Price and the Civil War in the West and The Presidency of Andrew Johnson.

Kansas University Ordering Information: Our online ordering feature is currently under construction. You can order books from the University Press of Kansas by calling 785-864-4155. Orders can also be emailed to upkorders@ku.edu. Our shipping charges: $5.00 for first book, $1.00 for each additional book

 

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